Conservation

The Annual Cycle Of Wolves – Winter

As an appreciator of wolves, I’ve found them to be misunderstood and mysterious animals. It’s inspired me to come up with a blogging series about the annual cycle of wolves. For every season I’ll be focusing on how a wolf lives and how they respond to the changing environment. Winter is a time for keeping warm, whether through finding shelter or curling up. Wolf activity during winter is less vigorous than other seasons.

(more…)

The Ingenuity Of The Golden Mole

Deserts are known to be harsh environments, testing even the most resilient animals. Yet one of the most adaptable is a creature that’s rarely seen. The golden mole is a small, burrowing animal that lives in Southern Africa and recently had a starring spot on David Attenborough’s Planet Earth II series. The species isn’t a true mole, rather a convergent family called Chrysochloridae.

(more…)

How You Can Help Save Britain’s Bees

Insect pollinators like bees have always been useful for the environment, and their benefit to people has been well documented. Our relationship with them goes as far back as 6000 BC in Spain, with humans relying on honey for food, medicine and candle-making. Bees are responsible for pollinating more than 90 flowering crops, including apples, cucumbers, cherries, blueberries and avacados.

(more…)

Walking A Tight Rope With The Bateleur Eagle

A feature named ‘The Hunter’s High Road.’ Check back to see an animal that represents the apex of predatory evolution. Carnivores come in a range of shapes and sizes, using a variety of tricks to catch their prey. Some are powerful, some are beautiful. All are deadly.

The hunter I’m focusing on today is the Bateleur Eagle, named after the French word for street performer. The name comes from the bird’s characteristic habit of rocking its wings from side to side when gliding. This gives it the appearance of a tight-rope walker, as if the eagle is catching its balance.

(more…)

Planet Earth II – Jungles

Half way through the series, and Planet Earth II continues to impress with amazing visuals and unforgettable sights. This week, David Attenborough took viewers into the jungle to see how animals fight to survive. The opening shot revealed an Indri leaping through the tree tops of Madagascar. Indri are the largest lemurs on the planet, and listening to the mournful song of the female was a great way to set the tone for the program.

(more…)

Having A Nosy At The Proboscis Monkey

As primates are our closest living relatives, it’s only natural they are diverse like us. From powerful gorillas to beautiful golden lion tamarins, primates have colonised every continent. One of the most unique species is the proboscis monkey of Borneo. Known for their distinctive long nose, proboscis monkeys have a number of weird and wonderful traits.

(more…)

The Secret Lives Of Coastal Wolves

When we think of wolves we have an image of a pack loping through the trees, hunting together and howling at the moon. But wolves are a diverse species and not all of them are the same. One of the most elusive types are the coastal wolves found on the shore of Canada’s Vancouver Island. Also known as sea wolves, this population of gray wolf is known to feed on salmon, river otters, seals and whale carcasses.

(more…)

Breaking Myths About Owls

We’ve all heard stories about owls and certain things we associate with them: they’re wise, they can turn their heads 360 degrees and only make hooting noises. None of that is true, as mythology and folklore have shrouded owls for centuries. Although they are incredible hunters, owls really aren’t much smarter than other birds and here’s why.

(more…)

The (Tasmanian) Devil You Know

A feature named ‘The Hunter’s High Road.’ Check back to see an animal that represents the apex of predatory evolution. Carnivores come in a range of shapes and sizes, using a variety of tricks to catch their prey. Some are powerful, some are beautiful. All are deadly.

Predators don’t have to be big and intimidating to be top hunters, and that is the case with the Tasmanian Devil. Native only to Tasmania, the carnivorous marsupial is known for its powerful bite, distinctive screech and ferocity when it comes to feeding. The size of a small dog, Tasmanian Devils have large, thick heads with males being bigger than females. Males have an average body length of 10.2 inches while females are 9.6 inches.

(more…)